Latest News & Insights

Leadership/Executive Salaries

Leadership/Executive Salaries

Recruiting – make 2019 the year you get it right!

Recruiting – make 2019 the year you get it right!

Dollars and Sense

Dollars and Sense

Preparing for a Job Interview and Dealing with a Recruiter

Preparing for a Job Interview and Dealing with a Recruiter

Here's how to get that Promotion!

Here's how to get that Promotion!

View all
7 Reasons Why You’ll Get Recruitment Wrong

7 Reasons Why You’ll Get Recruitment Wrong

Over the two last quarters we have worked on a number of high profile roles. We also got to witness first hand a couple of pre-recruitment losses for our clients and had to step in to avoid some post recruitment fall-offs. 

What I mean by this is that we not only saw companies miss out on talent they badly wanted but we also had to ensure, post placement, that both parties were on track in this early and formative part of their relationship. 

We learned (and relearned!) some valuable lessons in this time and would like to pass this on, in reflection in the form of “Seven reasons why you’ll get it wrong” – i.e. how you might miss out on the person you wanted, or have tension in the early stages of your new hire.

1- YOU DIDN’T MAKE IT HAPPEN SOON ENOUGH

This one is a killer, of both your competitiveness and in terms of employee passion for your business. Simply said, an “offer out by Friday” has to mean an “offer out by Friday”. If you give your word to a potential employee, then keep your word. Remember, they are measuring you as the person they want to work for, as much as you are measuring them as your next employee. If you don’t make your recruitment decision inside a month and then quickly produce your offer and subsequent paper work, your competitors surely will.

2- YOU DIDN’T TALK TO THE REFERENCES YOURSELF

Even though we provide references, and consider our methods high above our competitors, we still recommend our clients talk to referees themselves. It’s compelling what a casual discussion between two managers or business owners can result in, especially if you describe the role to the reference and ask them to rate the candidate’s ability to deliver to the role. 

3- YOU HIRED THE ONE YOU LIKED THE MOST

Now don’t get me wrong here, I’m not saying you can’t hire people you like. What I’m saying is work backwards to this step from the most qualified and experienced for the role, instead of “we like him the most and he can probably learn what we want”. Hire the candidate who will appeal to your client base and has proven abilities, not the one who will be the life of the party at work functions.

4- YOUR PROCESS IS RUDIMENTARY 

I recently visited a client who interviewed at a café, hired after one interview and generally only did one reference. Review your process! How in-depth are you getting in assessing your potential employees? 

5- YOU DIDN’T LISTEN

Ask the hard questions and listen to the answer. What money does your employee need to earn? What are their career aspirations? What do they not like about their current role? What are they really looking for in their next employer? Remember – it’s a marriage – the person might be right for you, but is your business right for them?

6- YOU THINK THAT RECRUITING TIME IS BARGAIN TIME

The time to find a bargain in business is when negotiating with your suppliers, your landlord or your bank manager (if you’re lucky!), not when recruiting. To roughly quote Jim Collins, the secret to accelerated revenue is securing the top talent in the market. Correspondingly, their expectations are at the top of the market as well. Shopping for a recruitment bargain is counterproductive to your growth plans – get real, and don’t do it.

7- YOU WERE NOT SET UP OR PREPARED FOR THE PERSON TO COME ON BOARD

Throwing your new hire a set of car keys and a wink creates a very poor impression on their starting Monday. All too often we see and hear from employees two or three weeks in who are still waiting for business cards, the car they were promised, brochures and catalogues, any form of training, etc. All of a sudden the other offer they received at the same time they accepted yours starts to look very attractive. Ensure you are prepared with the tools of the trade and have a dedicated induction process to welcome your new person to the fold.

Jeremy Wilson